10-01
09-30
09-30
09-30
09-30
09-29
09-29
09-29
09-29
09-28
09-28
09-28
09-28
09-25
09-25
09-25
09-23
09-23
09-22
09-22
09-20
09-17
09-17
09-17
09-17
09-17
09-17
09-17
09-17
09-17
09-14
09-14
09-14
09-14
09-11
09-11
09-11
09-11
09-11
09-11

All bulletin boards are free to use. However, in order to minimize spam, we cordially request that you sign in before you post. SIGN IN or SIGN UP

Health Legal Auto Entertainment World News

?

Shortcut

PrevPrev Article

NextNext Article

Larger Font Smaller Font Up Down Go comment Print Attachment
?

Shortcut

PrevPrev Article

NextNext Article

Larger Font Smaller Font Up Down Go comment Print Attachment

By Ann E. Marimow | Washington Post
August 6, 2020 at 1:41 p.m. CDT


0_730_400.jpg


A federal appeals court on Wednesday sided with the Trump administration’s effort to implement regulations that make it harder for immigrants to seek permanent residency in the United States if they have relied on public assistance programs.

 

The split ruling from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit reverses a lower-court injunction that had blocked the “public charge” rule from taking effect.

 

The decision comes one day after a different appeals court ruled against the administration in a similar challenge brought by immigrant groups that argue the rule discourages legal immigrants from using any public benefits such as Medicaid, food stamps or housing assistance.

 

At issue are rules that establish new criteria for who can be considered dependent on the government for public assistance and therefore disqualified for green cards and a path to U.S. citizenship. Under the 2019 Department of Homeland Security policy, immigrants who are in the United States legally are considered “public charges” and ineligible if they use any benefits or are declared likely to someday rely on such assistance.

 

Despite the 4th Circuit’s decision Wednesday, the rule remains blocked for now because of a separate nationwide injunction issued by a New York judge in late July. The order bars the government from enforcing the rule for the duration of the national health emergency declared in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

 

The Maryland case was brought by the immigrant rights organization CASA de Maryland and two individuals who immigrated to the United States as children.

 

In a 2-to-1 ruling, the 4th Circuit called the rule “unquestionably lawful” and said the group lacked legal grounds to challenge it.

 

The majority said the court must defer to the executive when it comes to shaping federal immigration policy and criticized the nationwide scope of the preliminary injunction issued by U.S. District Judge Paul W. Grimm of Greenbelt, Md.

 

Read more on Washington Post


  1. Court sides with Trump administration effort to impose ‘public charge’ rule

    By Ann E. Marimow | Washington Post August 6, 2020 at 1:41 p.m. CDT A federal appeals court on Wednesday sided with the Trump administration’s effort to implement regulations that make it harder for immigrants to seek permanent residen...
    Date2020.08.07 ByAsiaInDallas Views55
    Read More
  2. Thousands wait to take US citizenship oath amid COVID-19 delays

    Author: PHILIP MARCELO (Associated Press) Published: 5:37 PM CDT May 24, 2020 Updated: 5:37 PM CDT May 24, 2020 Wendy De Los Santos passed the test to become a U.S. citizen just days before government offices shut down nationwide because of...
    Date2020.05.25 ByAsiaInDallas Views40
    Read More
  3. Dallas Asian American Bar Association Panel Discussion on Bias Againt Asians

    The long history of bias against Asian people, intensified by current politics, leads to the kind of behavior that's hurting Asian-American businesses in Dallas-Fort Worth. And with the arrival of more positive cases of COVID-19 in Nort...
    Date2020.05.25 ByAsiaInDallas Views65
    Read More
  4. Nearly 100 Charged in Massive Marriage Fraud Scheme

    USCIS | Release Date: May 14, 2019 HOUSTON – A total of 50 people are now in custody following the return of a 206-count indictment alleging varying roles in a large-scale marriage fraud scheme, announced U.S. Attorney Ryan K. Patrick ...
    Date2019.05.17 ByAsiaInDallas Views457
    Read More
  5. It may take 2 years to identify thousands of separated families, government says

    By Catherine E. Shoichet and Priscilla Alvarez, CNN Updated 11:59 AM ET, Sat April 6, 2019 (CNN)It could take up to two years for the government to identify potentially thousands of additional immigrant families US authorities separated at t...
    Date2019.05.06 ByAsiaInDallas Views472
    Read More
  6. How affirmative action has benefitted Asian-Americans

    By CINDY CHO | February 23, 2019 When I first heard of the square-off between Students for Fair Admissions against Harvard, I instantly sent the CNN article announcing the court case to my high-schooler of a cousin saying that even though I ...
    Date2019.02.25 ByAsiaInDallas Views192
    Read More
  7. Advocates allege NYC school plan discriminates against Asian Americans

    A group of Asian-American education advocates are suing New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and schools Chancellor Richard Carranza for making changes to an admissions policy that they claim discriminates against and disproportionately affec...
    Date2018.12.18 ByAsiaInDallas Views44
    Read More
  8. Judge throws out most of lawsuit against Trump immigration move

    The Trump administration provided adequate justification for its decision to end a program that reunited hundreds of immigrants from Central America with family members in the U.S., a federal judge ruled Monday. Magistrate Judge Laurel Beel...
    Date2018.12.12 ByAsiaInDallas Views101
    Read More
List
Board Pagination Prev 1 Next
/ 1
CLOSE